Mt. Redoubt Volcano

Mt. Redoubt Volcano - Current Update


Mt. Redoubt Volcano Statistics

  • Redoubt Current: Alert Level NORMAL
  • Redoubt Current: Color Code GREEN
  • Type:  Stratovolcano
  • Seismically Monitored:  Yes
  • Distance:  103 mi (166 km) from Anchorage
  • Elevation:  10197 ft (3108 m)
  • Latitude:  60.4852° N
  • Longitude:  152.7438° W
  • Quadrangle:  Kenai
  • Most Recent Activity:  March 15, 2009
  • CAVW Number:  1103-03-

Mt.Redoubt Volcano Location

Redoubt Volcano Location

Description

From Miller et al (1998): "Redoubt Volcano is a steep-sided cone about 10 km in diameter at its base and with a volume of 30-35 cubic kilometers. The volcano is composed of intercalated pyroclastic deposits and lava flows and rests on Mesozoic granitic rocks of the Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith (Till and others, 1993; 1994). It has been moderately dissected by the action of numerous alpine glaciers. A 1.8-km-wide, ice-filled summit crater is breached on the north side by a northward-flowing glacier, informally known as the Drift Glacier, which spreads into a piedmont lobe in the upper Drift River Valley. The most recently active vent is located on the north side of the crater at the head of the Drift glacier. Holocene lahar deposits in the Crescent River and Drift River valleys extend downstream as far as Cook Inlet."




 Alaska Volcano Observatory Current Update

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Friday, September 21, 2018, 1:57 PM AKDT (Friday, September 21, 2018, 21:57 UTC)
SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color code: ORANGE

Unrest continues at Semisopochnoi volcano. Seismic tremor has continued since its initial onset on Sunday September 16 prompted AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to YELLOW/ADVISORY. A clear satellite view from September 10 revealed a small ash deposit on the flanks of the north cone of Mount Cerberus, which may have resulted from two minor seismic tremor bursts recorded on September 8. The combination of this satellite imagery and an increase in seismic tremor amplitudes prompted AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to ORANGE/WATCH on Monday September 17. There has been no clear evidence of ash emissions from regional infrasound data or satellite images over the past week; however, windy and cloudy conditions throughout the week have limited our ability to substantiate eruptive activity. The September 10 ash deposit indicates the potential for ash emissions coincident with the ongoing elevated seismicity. Thus Semisopochnoi volcano's status remains at ORANGE/WATCH.

Semisopochnoi is monitored with an on-island seismic network, and remotely by satellite and lightning sensors. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a 13 minute delay if atmospheric conditions permit.


Remote Semisopochnoi volcano occupies the largest, young volcanic island in the western Aleutians. The volcano is dominated by an 8-km (5-mile) diameter caldera that contains a small lake and a number of post-caldera cones and craters. The age of the caldera is not known with certainty but is likely early Holocene. The last known eruption of Semisopochnoi occurred in 1987, probably from Sugarloaf Peak on the south coast of the island, but details are lacking. Another prominent, young post-caldera landform is Mount Cerberus, a three-peaked cone cluster in the southwest part of the caldera. The island is uninhabited and part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. It is located 65 km (40 mi) northeast of Amchitka Island and 200 km (130 mi) west of Adak.

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312070)
56°11'52" N 159°23'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color code: ORANGE

Veniaminof continues to erupt, feeding a lava flow that extends about 800 m (0.5 mi) down the south flank of its summit cone. Recent satellite imagery from September 18 indicate that the lava flow front has not advanced, and the flow is confined to the summit caldera. Images from an FAA web camera in Perryville recorded incandescence at night throughout the week, when visibility was good, and a gas plume has been occasionally visible during clear daytime conditions. No significant ash emissions are being produced. Satellite data have shown elevated surface temperatures throughout the week, and seismicity remains elevated with continuous tremor being recorded locally.

Mount Veniaminof volcano is an andesitic stratovolcano with an ice-filled 10-km diameter summit caldera located on the Alaska Peninsula, 775 km (480 mi) southwest of Anchorage and 35 km (22 mi) north of Perryville. Veniaminof is one of the largest (~300 cubic km; 77 cubic mi) and most active volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc and has erupted at least 13 times in the past 200 years. Recent significant eruptions of the volcano occurred in 1993-95, 2005, and 2013. These were Strombolian eruptions that produced lava fountains and minor emissions of ash and gas from the main intracaldera cone. During the 1993-95 activity, a small lava flow was extruded, and in 2013, five small lava flows effused from the intracaldera cone over about five months. Minor ash-producing explosions occurred nearly annually between 2002 and 2010. Previous historical eruptions have produced ash plumes that reached 20,000 ft above sea level (1939 and 1956) and ash fallout that blanketed areas within about 40 km (25 mi) of the volcano (1939).

CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color code: YELLOW

Moderately elevated surface temperatures in the summit crater of Cleveland volcano were observed in satellite thermal data throughout the week. The most recent unobscured satellite view on September 10 shows evidence of an emplaced lava dome within the crater; however, it is unclear if the dome is actively growing at this time due to cloudy conditions over the past week. No significant activity was detected in seismic and infrasound (pressure) sensor data.

Future explosive activity is likely and is expected to occur without warning. Previous explosions have produced hazardous conditions primarily near the volcano, but occasionally they have been large enough to produce a drifting ash cloud.

Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


Cleveland volcano forms the western portion of Chuginadak Island, a remote and uninhabited island in the east central Aleutians. The volcano is located about 75 km (45 mi) west of the community of Nikolski, and 1500 km (940 mi) southwest of Anchorage. The most recent significant period of eruption began in February, 2001 and produced 3 explosive events that generated ash clouds as high as 39,000 ft above sea level. The 2001 eruption also produced a lava flow and hot avalanche that reached the sea. Since then, Cleveland has been intermittently active producing small lava flows, often followed by explosions that generate small ash clouds generally below 20,000 ft above sea level. These explosions also launch debris onto the slopes of the cone producing hot pyroclastic avalanches and lahars that sometimes reach the coastline.

GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color code: YELLOW

Low-level unrest continues at Great Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity remains elevated with small earthquakes occurring at rates above background levels. Additionally there was a minor tremor burst recorded on Tuesday, September 18. Similar tremor signals have been seen over the past several months, one of which resulted from a phreatic explosion that produced a small ash deposit near the summit on June 10. Tuesday's event was smaller than previous signals and no activity was observed in satellite images or regional infrasound data, although views of the volcano have been obscured by clouds over the past week.

Great Sitkin Volcano is monitored with a local real-time seismic network, which will typically allow AVO to detect changes in unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption would be accomplished using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


Great Sitkin Volcano is a basaltic andesite volcano that occupies most of the northern half of Great Sitkin Island, a member of the Andreanof Islands group in the central Aleutian Islands. It is located 43 km (26 miles) east of the community of Adak. The volcano is a composite structure consisting of an older decapitated volcano and a younger parasitic cone with a 2-3 km diameter summit crater. A steep-sided lava dome, emplaced during an eruption in 1974, occupies the center of the crater. Great Sitkin erupted at least three times in the 20th century, most recently in 1974. That eruption produced a lava dome and at least one ash cloud that likely exceeded an altitude of 25,000 ft above sea level. A poorly documented eruption occurred in 1945, also producing a lava dome that was partially destroyed in the 1974 eruption. Within the past 280 years a large explosive eruption produced pyroclastic flows that partially filled the Glacier Creek valley on the southwest flank.



Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory




Mount Redoubt Volcano Cam


This is a static image of Mount Redoubt, The VolcanoCam image automatically updates approximately every two hours.
Volcano image courtesy of ...
Live webcam images of various Alaskan volcanoes
Alaska Volcano Observatory Webcam - Redoubt - DFR

Images of Mount Redoubt

Gallery 1 Gallery 2


Augustine volcano (VNUM #313010)
59.3626° N 153.435° W, Summit Elevation 4134 ft (1260 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Augustine - island webcam
webcam image



Information courtesy of ...
U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys.
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